Reporter Kelly Stevens on Assignment for TBP at the Venice Biennale 2015

by the-biennial-project 5. September 2015 06:40

“Venice is like eating an entire box of chocolate liqueurs in one go.” Truman Capote

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We clearly run with a pretty cool crowd. And none is cooler than our long-time collaborator – artist and writer Kelly Stevens - pictured above  left at The Biennial Project’s reception at the Venice Biennale in May. And we are ever so proud to share with you her reactions to the 2015 Venice Biennale:      

                                                                                                                        1avenice3  “As tourists flock to see the spectacles of the World’s Fair in Milan, another “must-see” event is only minutes away in Venice, Italy. The Venice Biennale is considered the World’s Fair of art with 53 countries participating and presenting extraordinary pieces of work. Originating in 1895, the Biennale is a major contemporary art exhibition which takes place once every two years.

This year’s Biennale experience was again exceptional. On my visit through the national pavilions, each country approached the Biennale’s theme “All the World’s Futures” in unique ways. Some art installations triggered deep emotions while others offered a more whimsical experience. And others clearly had expressive political statement.

Needless to say, a diverse range of emotional experiences can be expected as one makes their way through the Biennale.

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Among my favorites this year, the large scale installations appealed to me the most. France’s “Revolutions” by Celeste Boursier-Mougenot included trees which subtly moved through the art space in front of patiently waiting onlookers lounging on nearby foam steps.

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The eclectic Canadian pavilion similarly was intriguing as I experienced a transformative journey beginning within a convenience store before eventually ending in a life-sized Pachinko game where the curious can put a quarter in the slot and see its path.

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The art which struck me the most deeply, however, was “A Key in the Hand” by Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota. The massive art work gave me a feeling of intense connection with humanity and the world with its spider web of red yarn, keys and ancient Japanese fishing boats. This installation reminded me that life and death are about the journey and the connection of stories and people. In essence, everything is significant and matters because we all have the power to make the world a better place.

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Of all the amazing installations present in this year’s Biennale, this one allowed me to best connect with the theme of this year’s event. In a world which is becoming increasingly smaller, the relevance and importance of human and natural connections is likewise increasing. And indeed, all the world’s futures depend on how we respect, cherish, and act upon these connections. Being able to visualize this concept in such dramatic fashion was certainly powerful, and one of the many reasons this year’s Biennale is an event not to be missed.”

Kelly Stevens, 2015

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